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  • Farming in Ugandan schools

    Posted on June 12, 2015

    Farming or agriculture is the major occupation in Uganda. However, for the young folks, this activity is looked down at and considered to be an activity for the old rural people.Hence, no youth wants to be seen farming. For that reason, everyone is leaving idle land in rural areas and running to towns to do all sorts of jobs that do not add much to them.

    Therefore when you find a school that doesn’t concentrate on academics alone but a wholesome set of skills, you stop and first appreciate.

    one of the students tending to tomatoes in the green house

    one of the students tending to tomatoes in the green house

    Gayaza High School is that school. It is one of the oldest and best schools in the country that have produced the very best of ladies in the land. Getting admitted to the school is so hard but once in, it is worth it.

    20150612_161218What I find most intriguing is the farming tradition done on 62 acres. Once admitted, every girl is given a small garden or they plant a banana plant and care for it till harvest time. The motivation given is that they sell their harvests to the school dining and their model plants/ gardens are used for academics as well. They have a green house, rear their own chicken, have a piggery, a cow farm and many others; all using good farming methods.

    The waste got from the farm unit and piggery is used to make bio gas.

    They also promote cultural preservation. They often times hold concerts at the National Cultural Center sensitizing the public through dance and drama. At such occasions, they also cook local foods and serve them dressed in their traditional attire. This usually attracts very many people and the best catch is that the exhibitions are done by young girls.

    So, they not only get an excellent education, but also farming skills, money from their sales, and awareness about cultural preservation.

    They organize school camps to which other schools come to learn on farming, the girls also go to communities to share farming tips and experiences.

    Gayaza students(blue and green t-shirts) take students from other schools on a farm tour.

    Gayaza students(blue and green t-shirts) take students from other schools on a farm tour.

     

    girls being evaluated by their agriculture teacher on the banana plantation

    girls being evaluated by their agriculture teacher on the banana plantation

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    The schools hires experts in crop husbandry to come teach the girls and this knowledge is carried on to their homes.

    Starting them young is key because it will be part of them and the acquired good traditions will be passed on.

    Now, who wouldn’t want such schools sprouting all over the place?

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